International

null
A Mexican Federal Police officer pauses during a ceremony to honor officers recently
killed in Mexico City (AP).

Mexican Official’s Killing Highlights Drug-Related Violence

May 09, 2008 04:38 PM
by findingDulcinea Staff
by Cara McDonough
One of Mexico’s top security officials has been shot dead in what appears to be the latest revenge killing by one of Mexico’s most notorious drug cartels.

30-Second Summary

facebook
Officials said Edgar Millan Gomez, 41, was shot nine times Thursday outside his home in Mexico City. Millan Gomez was the national coordinator of the country’s fight against organized crime.

Police believe the Sinaloa cartel is behind the attack. His death could be the latest in a national backlash against Mexican President Felipe Calderon’s war on drugs; seven mid-ranking officials, in addition to Millan Gomez, have been killed in the past month.

And the latest murders are only a small part of the drug- and crime-related violence since Calderon took office in December, 2006. Last year, 2,500 people were killed across the country in organized crime–related incidents, with another 1,000 killings so far this year.

The reactive killing sprees have prompted some to say that Calderon’s methods—which focus on an amped-up military presence across the country, including at the airport and on highways—won’t work in the long run.

Some drug-war experts say that the military presence may help thwart Mexico’s major drug trafficking problem in the short term, but better intelligence, investigations and judicial processes are needed to maintain momentum.

Others, like Juarez resident Bernardo Washington, say the intimidating message sent by soldiers lining the streets will work, little by little.

“No one's selling drugs in the streets anymore," he says. “They're scared of the power of the state."

Headline Link: Mexico’s top organized crime fighter killed

Related Topics: Calderon’s drug war

Background Links: The drug gang war

Key Player: President Felipe Calderon

facebook

Most Recent Beyond The Headlines