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Sites for Learning About Countries

October 27, 2011
by findingDulcinea Staff
The sites below have a cool collection of tools to help you learn about different countries. A lot of students have to research countries, and by starting with these sites, you’ll be able to write the most accurate and interesting report possible without boarding an airplane.

For Young Students

National Geographic’s “Find People & Places” allows you to do just that. It has facts, photos, videos, and maps, and you can even e-mail your friend a postcard.

Time for Kids’ Around the World takes you on a tour of countries and even a couple of U.S. states through sightseeing guides, folktales, quizzes, and more.

Scholastic’s Global Trek lets you plan your own virtual trip to any of 35 different countries, read all about their cultures and customs, and write down all that you learn in your own travel journal.

The World Almanac for Kids doesn’t just give facts and figures, it tells the stories of kids from around the world. See how different your life is from the life of a student in India, Japan, or Peru!

For Middle and High School Students

The CIA World FactBook might be a bit dry, but it is one of the most reliable sites for basic facts, figures, and comparisons between countries.

The BBC’s Country Profiles is similar to the CIA World FactBook, but it’s easier to navigate and gives a clearer outline of each country’s background, leaders and media.

The U.S. Department of State
provides a thorough and up-to-date overview of every country you would research with its Background Notes.

The Country Studies/Area Handbook Series is a compilation of books written between 1986 and 1998 that details the history of more than 110 countries, dating back to the earliest settlements. It was created by U.S. Department of the Army and printed by the Library of Congress.

The Library of Congress’ Portals to the World is a compilation of links to the best online resources about individual countries, great for those seeking a much deeper understanding of a country.

The University of Richmond’s Constitution Finder allows you to read countries’ constitutions in either English or the original language.

NationMaster compiles data from sources as the CIA World Factbook, UN and OECD, and makes it easy to compare data from one country to another.

The International Monetary Fund offers recent economic news and data about countries and other territorial entities around the world.

McKinsey Quarterly
is a periodic report, prepared by one of the world’s leading consulting firms, about economic and sociological developments in countries around the world.

The World Health Organization reports on health conditions and matters in all of its member countries.

GeoHive breaks down census numbers by country and by topic. It’s a good site for a more sophisticated report.

Using GoogleEarth

GoogleEarth is a free program that you can download to take a virtual tour of a country’s buildings and terrain.

Dr. Alice Christie’s GoogleEarth Resource Guide is a tutorial on how to conduct your own research using GoogleEarth.

Juicy Geography is a decent blog with tips, links, and sample GoogleEarth lesson plans.

GoogleSightseeing is another GoogleEarth blog does the research for you. Browse the site for intimate glimpses into global landmarks.

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